Category: Completed Projects

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Anaana’s Tent Season 2 (2020)

It’s summertime in the Arctic, and host, Rita Claire, sets up camp at her mother’s tent on the land. With the help of her old husky, Qimmiq, and a cast of special friends, Rita Claire sings songs, plays games, reads stories and learns new words in Inuktitut. Special guests, including Kathleen Merritt, Looee Arreak, Susan Aglukark, and Northern Haze, drop by to visit. Anaana’s Tent is an entertaining and educational preschool TV series that prepares children for Kindergarten. The series is a mixture of live-action, puppet, and animated segments and is filled with Northern stories. Anaana’s Tent teaches Inuit values of kindness, friendship, patience and environmental stewardship.

13 x 22 mins, live action & animation, Inuktitut & English

Credits: 

Head Writer: Neil Christopher

Writers: Nadia Mike, Nadia Sammurtok, Neil Christopher, Bronwyn Szabo, Ali Hinch, Philip Eddolls, Amelia Spedaliere

 

Directors: Roselynn Akulukjuk, Anguti Johnston, Mark Aspland, Neil Christopher, Daniel Christopher

 

Producers: Monica Ittusardjuat, Neil Christopher, Danny Christopher, Nadia Mike

 

Where to Watch:

APTN Lumi

Join us on social media:

Facebook: @anaanastenttv

Instagram: @anaanastent

Twitter: @anaanastent

Pinterest: @anaanastent

 

Anaana’s Tent Season 2 Trailer – Inuktitut

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Ukaliq & Kalla Season 1 (2020)

Set in the Arctic, Ukaliq & Kalla is an educational children’s animated series that follows two lively characters—Ukaliq, an excitable and impulsive Arctic hare, and Kalla, an even-tempered and intelligent lemming. This unlikely pair leads young viewers on entertaining and educational adventures that teach valuable lessons. Often unprepared and impatient, Ukaliq tends to get himself into trouble, but calm and thoughtful Kalla is always right there to lend a hand and help his friend. Together, Ukaliq and Kalla introduce children to life in the North and provide teachable moments for a preschool audience of 2- to 5-year-olds.

13 x 11 mins, 2D animation, Inuktitut & English 

 

Credits: 

Writers: Roselynn Akulukjuk, Neil Christopher, Champagne Brittany Choquer, Luke Coleman, Erik Blohm-Gagné, Nadia Mike, Nadia Sammurtok

Directors: Roselynn Akulukjuk, Luke Coleman

Producers: Monica Ittusardjuat, Daniel Christopher, Neil Christopher

 

Where to Watch:

IsumaTV

 

Join us on social media:

Facebook: @ukaliqandkalla

Instagram: @ukaliqandkalla

Twitter: @ukaliqandkalla

 

How Nivi Got Her Names (2019)

Nivi has always known that her names were special, but she does not know where they came from. So, one cold afternoon, Nivi decides to ask her mom. The stories of the people Nivi is named after lead her to an understanding of traditional Inuit kinship naming practices, tuqlurausiit, and knowledge of what those practices mean to Inuit. Through her names, Nivi is a little girl, a grandfather, a grandmother, and a well-respected elder. Nivi’s names connect her to the personality and character of those who have passed and make her family so much bigger than she thought before.

7 mins, 2D animation, Inuktitut & English

 

Credits:

Written by Laura Deal

Directed by Laura Deal

Produced by Neil Christopher and Monica Ittusardjuat

 

Awards and Nominations:

Award Nominee 

  • 2019 American Indian Film Festival (San Francisco, CA, USA) – Best Animation

Screening 

  • 2019 Vox Popular Media Arts Festival (Thunder Bay, ON, Canada)
  • 2019 Gig Harbor Film Festival (Gig Harbor, WA, USA)
  • 2019 FIN Kids Festival Tour (Atlantic Canada)
  • 2019 Nuuk International Film Festival (Nuuk, Greenland)
  • 2020 Māoriland Film Festival (Ōtaki, New Zealand)
  • 2020 Children’s Film Festival Seattle (Seattle, WA, USA)
  • 2020 Bellingham Children’s Film Festival (Bellingham, WA, USA)
  • 2020 Underexposed Film Festival (Rock Hill, SC, USA)
  • 2020 Native Spirit Film Festival (London, UK)
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What’s My Superpower (2019)

Nalvana feels like all of her friends have some type of superpower. She has friends with super speed, friends who can jump so far she thinks they can fly, and friends who are better than her at a million other things. As Nalvana tries out each of her friends’ superpowers with no success, she wonders if she might be the only kid in town without a special talent. But then her mom shows Nalvana that she is unique and special—and that her superpower was right in front of her all along.

9 mins, 2D animation, Inuktitut & English

 

Credits:

Written by Aviaq Johnston

Directed by Justin Heymans

Produced by Neil Christopher and Monica Ittusardjuat

 

Awards and Nominations:

Award Nominee 

  • 2019 Ottawa International Animation Festival (Ottawa, ON, Canada) – Young Audiences Competition (Preschool)

Screenin

  • 2019 Chicago International Children’s Film Festival (Chicago, IL, USA)
  • 2019 Gig Harbor Film Festival (Gig Harbor, WA, USA)
  • 2019 Regent Park Film Festival (Toronto, ON, Canada)
  • 2019 Cork Film Festival (Cork, Ireland) 
  • 2019 Nuuk International Film Festival (Nuuk, Greenland)
  • 2020 Māoriland Film Festival (Ōtaki, New Zealand)
  • 2020 Freeze Frame International Film Festival for Kids of All Ages (Winnipeg, MB, Canada)
  • 2020 Children’s Film Festival Seattle (Seattle, WA, USA)
  • 2020 Bellingham Children’s Film Festival (Bellingham, WA, USA)
  • 2020 BAMkids Film Festival (Brooklyn, NY, USA)
  • 2020 PLAY Lisbon’s International Kids Film Festival (Lisbon, Portugal)
  • 2020 Underexposed Film Festival (Rock Hill, SC, USA)
  • 2020 Providence Children’s Film Festival (Providence, RI, USA)
  • 2020 Reel 2 Reel International Film Festival for Youth (Vancouver, BC, Canada) (Festival cancelled due to COVID-19)
  • 2020 Aspen Shortsfest (Aspen, CO, USA)
  • 2020 The Scene: Youth Media Festival (Saskatoon, SK, Canada) (Festival cancelled due to COVID-19)
  • 2020 Dawson City International Short Film Festival (Dawson City, YT, Canada)
  • 2020 Anibar Animation Festival (Pejë, Kosovo) (online edition due to COVID-19)
  • 2020 Native Spirit Film Festival (London, UK)
  • 2020 Mill Valley Film Festival (San Rafael, CA, USA)
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The Giant Bear (2018)

Centered on a confrontation between the last monster bear and an Inuit hunter, Giant Bear is a chilling short that brings an ancient story out of the North. In Giant Bear, we follow a hunter in the depths of starvation. The snow is thick, his dogs are mysteriously dying and food is nowhere to be found. A quest for answers leads him straight to a nanurluk, an iceberg-sized polar bear, setting up a “kill or be killed” battle that pits one man’s wits against a fearsome foe.

 

10 mins, 2D animation, Inuktitut w/ English subtitles

 

Credits:

Written by Neil Christopher 

Based on the Inuit traditional story of “Nanurluk / The Giant Bear” shared by Jose Angutinngurniq

Directed by Neil Christopher and Daniel Gies

Produced by Monica Ittusardjuat, Neil Christopher, Daniel Gies, Emily Paige

Co-Produced with e→d films 

 

Awards and Nominations:

Award Winner

  • 2020 Canadian Screen Awards (Toronto, ON, Canada) – Winner of Best Animated Short
  • 2019 Athens Animfest (Athens, Greece) – Audience Award Short
  • 2019 Fantasia Film Festival (Montreal, QC, Canada) – Special Jury Mention for Short Film in Satoshi Kon Award for Achievement in Animation
  • 2019 Dreamspeakers International Film Festival (Edmonton, AB, Canada) – Outstanding Achievement in Animation
  • 2019 GIRAF Festival of Independent Animation (Calgary, AB, Canada) – Audience Choice: Best Canadian Short and Jury Award: Honourable Mention

Award Nominee

  • 2019 Yorkton Film Festival (Yorkton, SK, Canada) – Nominated for Kathleen Shannon Award
  • 2019 LA Skins Fest (Los Angeles, CA, USA) – Nominated for Achievement in Animation

Screening

  • 2019 Annecy International Animated Film Festival (Annecy, France)
  • 2019 Ottawa International Animation Festival (Ottawa, ON, Canada)
  • 2019 Regard Saguenay International Short Film Festival (Chicoutimi, QC, Canada)
  • 2019 Festival de Cinéma de la Ville de Québec (Quebec City, QC, Canada)
  • 2019 GLAS Animation (Berkeley, CA, USA)
  • 2019 Dawson City International Short Film Festival (Dawson City, YT, Canada)
  • 2019 Imaginaria (Conversano, Italy)
  • 2019 In the Palace International Short Film Festival (Burgas, Bulgaria)
  • 2019 Gen Con Film Festival (Indianapolis, IN, USA)
  • 2019 Anima Mundi (Rio de Janeiro & Sao Paulo, Brazil)
  • 2019 Wiesbaden International Festival of Animation (Wiesbaden, Germany)
  • 2019 FilmQuest Festival (Provo, UT, USA)
  • 2019 Vox Popular Media Arts Festival (Thunder Bay, ON, Canada)
  • 2019 Taichung International Animation Festival (Taichung, Taiwan)
  • 2019 KuanDu International Animation Festival (Taipei, Taiwan)
  • 2019 Nuuk International Film Festival (Nuuk, Greenland)
  • 2019 Foyle Film Festival (Derry, United Kingdom)
  • 2019 Sommets du cinéma d’animation (Montreal, QC, Canada)
  • 2019 Sommets du cinéma d’animation screening at Canadian Cultural Center Paris (Paris, France)
  • 2020 Māoriland Film Festival (Ōtaki, New Zealand)
  • 2020 Underexposed Film Festival (Rock Hill, SC, USA)
  • 2020 Weengushk International Film Festival (M’Chigeeng, ON, Canada)
  • 2020 Hiroshima International Animation Festival (Hiroshima, Japan) – Best of the World Announcement (no official screening)
Featured Video Play Icon

Anaana’s Tent Season 1 (2018)

It’s summertime in the Arctic, and host Rita Claire sets up camp at her mother’s tent on the land. With the help of her old husky, Qimmiq, and a cast of special friends, Rita Claire sings songs, plays games, reads stories and learns new words in Inuktitut. Special guests, including Celina Kalluk, Beatrice Deer, Looee Arreak, Meeka Arnakaq and the Jerry Cans, drop by to visit. Anaana’s Tent is an entertaining and educational preschool TV series that prepares children for Kindergarten. The series is a mixture of live-action, puppet, and animated segments and is filled with Northern stories. Anaana’s Tent teaches Inuit values of kindness, friendship, patience and environmental stewardship.

13 x 22 mins, live action & animation, Inuktitut & English 

 

Credits: 

Head Writer: Neil Christopher

Writers: Nadia Mike, Roselynn Akulukjuk, Daniel Christopher, William Flaherty, Maren Vsetula, Champagne Brittany Choquer, Philip Eddolls, Martha Grant

 

Directors: Nadia Mike, Roselynn Akulukjuk, Neil Christopher, Philip Eddolls, Daniel Christopher, Patrick Béland

 

Producer: Neil Christopher

 

Where to Watch:

APTN Lumi

IsumaTV

CBC Gem

Join us on social media:

Facebook: @anaanastenttv

Instagram: @anaanastent

Twitter: @anaanastent

Pinterest: @anaanastent

Anaana’s Tent Season 1 Trailer – Inuktitut

Ukaliq and Kalla Go Fishing (2017)

Ukaliq and Kalla Go Fishing tells the story of an ice-fishing trip taken by two unlikely friends—Ukaliq the Arctic hare and Kalla the lemming. Well-meaning but impatient, Ukaliq can’t catch a single Arctic char! Good thing Kalla is there. Embodying the calm, thoughtful nature of traditional hunters and those who live in the Arctic, Kalla shares his wisdom—and his snacks—with his unprepared friend. This fun, the educational short film shows how important it is to be patient, kind, and prepared for whatever comes.

5 minutes, 2D animation

Credits:

Written and Directed by Nadia Mike
Produced by Neil Christopher, Danny Christopher, and Louise Flaherty

 

Awards and Nominations:

Award Winner
  • 2017 Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum Native Cinema Showcase (New Mexico, USA) – Best Animated Short
Award Nominee
  • 2017 American Indian Film Festival (San Francisco, CA, USA) – Nominated for Animated Short
  • 2017 LA Skins Film Fest (Los Angeles, CA, USA) – Nominated for Best Animation
Screening
  • 2019 Nuuk International Film Festival (Nuuk, Greenland)

 

Join us on social media:

Facebook: @ukaliqandkalla

Instagram: @ukaliqandkalla

Twitter: @ukaliqandkalla

The Owl and the Lemming (2016)

The oral history of Inuit is filled with many folktales, legends, and myths. In this traditional story, a young owl catches a lemming to eat. Inuit stories are often instructive, and with this fable, children quickly learn the value of being clever and humble, and why pride and arrogance are to be avoided.
This short puppet film utilizes composited photographs and a set made with actual Arctic plants and lichen to create an authentic retelling of this ancient Arctic fable. This short film provides a glimpse of traditional Inuit values and beliefs.

3 minutes, Puppet animation 

Credits:

Directed by Roselynn Akulukjuk
Produced by Louise Flaherty and Neil Christopher
Screenplay by Roselynn Akulukjuk and Neil Christopher

Awards and Nominations:

Award Winner
  • 2017 Short. Sweet. Film Fest (Cleveland, OH, USA) – Honourable Mention in Animation
  • 2016 American Indian Film Festival (San Francisco, CA, USA) – Best Animation Co-Winner
Award Nominee
  • 2017 West Chester International Short Film Festival (West Chester, PA, USA) – Nominated for Best Animation Film
  • 2017 Yorkton Film Festival (Yorkton, SK, Canada) – Nominated in Children’s & Youth Category
  • 2017 Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum – Native Cinema Showcase (New Mexico, USA) – Nominated for Best Animated Short
  • 2016 LA Skins Film Fest (Los Angeles, CA, USA) – Nominated for Achievement in Animation Filmmaking
Screening
  • 2019 Nuuk International Film Festival (Nuuk, Greenland)

Little Folk of the Arctic (2015)

In the folklore of most cultures around the world there are stories of magical little folk. And the Arctic is no exception. Inuit traditional knowledge is filled with references to many different races and tribes of little folk. These beings always try to avoid human encounters, but over the years Inuit hunters and shaman have gathered stories and experiences to help us understand these small inhabitants.
This short introduces viewers to the little folk of the Arctic.

3 minutes, 2D animation 

Credits:

Directed by Neil Christopher
Produced by Louise Flaherty and Neil Christopher
Screenplay by Neil Christopher

Awards and Nominations:

Best Short Animation, Seoul Guro International Kids Film Festival (2016)

Best Animation (Nominee), American Indian Film Festival (2016)

Achievement in Animation Filmmaking (Nominee), Los Angeles Skins Film Festival (2016)

Best Animation (Nominee), Yorkton Film Festival (2017)

Awards and Nominations:

Award Winner
  • 2016 American Indian Film Festival (San Francisco, CA, USA) – Best Animation Co-Winner
  • 2016 Seoul Guro International Kids Film Festival (Seoul, South Korea) – Best Short Animation Winner
Award Nominee
  • 2017 Yorkton Film Festival (Yorkton, SK, Canada) – Nominated in Animation Category
  • 2016 LA Skins Film Fest (Los Angeles, CA, USA) – Nominated for Achievement in Animation Filmmaking
Screening
  • 2019 Nuuk International Film Festival (Nuuk, Greenland)

Ogress of the Gravelbank (2015)

Inuit oral history is filled with strange beings and supernatural creatures. One of these feared land spirits is the Ogress of the Gravelbank. This cruel being was known to lure children into her lair and trap them there. All that perish in that cave remain there as spirits and animated corpses.
This short vignette introduces viewers to this malevolent spirit who is unknown to all but the people of the far north.

3 minutes, 2D animation 

Credits:

Directed by Neil Christopher
Produced by Louise Flaherty and Neil Christopher
Screenplay by Neil Christopher

Awards and Nominations: 

Achievement in Animation Filmmaking (Nominee), Los Angeles Skins Film Festival (2016)

Best Animation (Nominee), Yorkton Film Festival (2017)

Awards and Nominations:

Award Winner
  • 2016 CreActive International Open Film Festival (Dhaka, Bangladesh) – Special Mention Award for “Animation Film”
  • 2015 Yorkton Film Festival (Yorkton, SK, Canada) – Best Children’s and Youth Production Winner
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The Amautalik (2014)

A neglected orphan and a kind little girl encounter one of the most dangerous land spirits from Inuit folktales—the Amautalik. This huge creature wanders the tundra, looking for children or lone travellers. When the Amautalik finds the two children far away from the safety of their camp, she is certain of her prize. But she didn’t count on the little orphan’s quick-thinking response.

Directed by Neil Christopher
Produced by Louise Flaherty and Neil Christopher
7 minutes
Stop-motion animation

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The Orphan and the Polar Bear (2013)

According to Inuit oral history, long ago animals had the power of speech, could shift their appearances, and could even assume human form. In The Orphan and the Polar Bear, a neglected orphan is adopted by a polar bear elder. Under the bear’s guidance, the little orphan learns the skills he will need to survive and provide for himself.

Directed by Neil Christopher
Produced by Louise Flaherty and Neil Christopher
9 minutes
2D animation

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