Category: Completed Projects

Ukaliq and Kalla Go Fishing (2017)

Ukaliq and Kalla Go Fishing tells the story of an ice-fishing trip taken by two unlikely friends—Ukaliq the Arctic hare and Kalla the lemming. Well-meaning but impatient, Ukaliq can’t catch a single Arctic char! Good thing Kalla is there. Embodying the calm, thoughtful nature of traditional hunters and those who live in the Arctic, Kalla shares his wisdom—and his snacks—with his unprepared friend. This fun, educational short film shows how important it is to be patient, kind, and prepared for whatever comes.

5 minutes, 2D animation

Credits:

Written and Directed by Nadia Mike
Produced by Neil Christopher, Danny Christopher, and Louise Flaherty

The Owl and the Lemming (2016)

The oral history of Inuit is filled with many folktales, legends, and myths. In this traditional story, a young owl catches a lemming to eat. Inuit stories are often instructive, and with this fable, children quickly learn the value of being clever and humble, and why pride and arrogance are to be avoided.
This short puppet film utilizes composited photographs and a set made with actual Arctic plants and lichen to create an authentic retelling of this ancient Arctic fable. This short film provides a glimpse of traditional Inuit values and beliefs.

3 minutes, Puppet animation 

Credits:

Directed by Roselynn Akulukjuk
Produced by Louise Flaherty and Neil Christopher
Screenplay by Roselynn Akulukjuk and Neil Christopher

Awards and Nominations:

Best Animation, American Indian Film Festival (2016)

Achievement in Animation Filmmaking (Nominee), Los Angeles Skins Film Festival (2016)

Honourable Mention in Animation, Short.Sweet.Film Fest (2017)

Best Animated Film (Nominee), West Chester Film Festival (2017)

Best Children’s and Youth Production (Nominee), Yorkton Film Festival (2017)

Upcoming Screenings:

No upcoming screenings at this time. Check back soon!

Little Folk of the Arctic (2015)

In the folklore of most cultures around the world there are stories of magical little folk. And the Arctic is no exception. Inuit traditional knowledge is filled with references to many different races and tribes of little folk. These beings always try to avoid human encounters, but over the years Inuit hunters and shaman have gathered stories and experiences to help us understand these small inhabitants.
This short introduces viewers to the little folk of the Arctic.

3 minutes, 2D animation 

Credits:

Directed by Neil Christopher
Produced by Louise Flaherty and Neil Christopher
Screenplay by Neil Christopher

Awards and Nominations:

Best Short Animation, Seoul Guro International Kids Film Festival (2016)

Best Animation (Nominee), American Indian Film Festival (2016)

Achievement in Animation Filmmaking (Nominee), Los Angeles Skins Film Festival (2016)

Best Animation (Nominee), Yorkton Film Festival (2017)

Upcoming Screenings:

No upcoming screenings at this time. Check back soon!

 

Ogress of the Gravelbank (2015)

Inuit oral history is filled with strange beings and supernatural creatures. One of these feared land spirits is the Ogress of the Gravelbank. This cruel being was known to lure children into her lair and trap them there. All that perish in that cave remain there as spirits and animated corpses.
This short vignette introduces viewers to this malevolent spirit who is unknown to all but the people of the far north.

3 minutes, 2D animation 

Credits:

Directed by Neil Christopher
Produced by Louise Flaherty and Neil Christopher
Screenplay by Neil Christopher

Awards and Nominations: 

Achievement in Animation Filmmaking (Nominee), Los Angeles Skins Film Festival (2016)

Best Animation (Nominee), Yorkton Film Festival (2017)

Upcoming Screenings:

No upcoming screenings at this time. Check back soon!

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The Amautalik (2014)

A neglected orphan and a kind little girl encounter one of the most dangerous land spirits from Inuit folktales—the Amautalik. This huge creature wanders the tundra, looking for children or lone travellers. When the Amautalik finds the two children far away from the safety of their camp, she is certain of her prize. But she didn’t count on the little orphan’s quick-thinking response.

Directed by Neil Christopher
Produced by Louise Flaherty and Neil Christopher
7 minutes
Stop-motion animation

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The Orphan and the Polar Bear (2013)

According to Inuit oral history, long ago animals had the power of speech, could shift their appearances, and could even assume human form. In The Orphan and the Polar Bear, a neglected orphan is adopted by a polar bear elder. Under the bear’s guidance, the little orphan learns the skills he will need to survive and provide for himself.

Directed by Neil Christopher
Produced by Louise Flaherty and Neil Christopher
9 minutes
2D animation

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